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SCIF Doors & Rooms, Defense Security and Radio Frequency Environments

SCIF Doors & Rooms, Defense Security and Radio Frequency Environments

When it comes to unravelling the mysteries of high-security openings, SCIF room design standards should be considered. The protection and strengthening of defenses and radio frequency (RF) environments is crucial in modern-day operations. Otherwise, a business runs the risk of compromised intelligence, security, or even compliance violations.

What are SCIF Rooms & SCIF Doors Specifications?

If you’re wondering, “what does SCIF stand for?” then you’ve come to the right place. We’ll not only define SCIF in general but also dive deeper, exploring the fundamentals of SCIF room design, hardware, and other specifications, all of which can and should be avoided.

What is a SCIF Room?

Believe it or not, there are places that cannot be protected by a simple locked door. Government buildings, safe rooms, and other important areas where highly sensitive information is processed, stored, and/or discussed are under constant threat of being hacked or compromised digitally as well as physically. Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) rooms are the security solution for these incredibly important areas. 

SCIFs can be permanent or temporary, and can be set up in government buildings, on ships, private residences of officials, hotel rooms and other places of necessity for officials when traveling. SCIF rooms in U.S. facilities around the world follow the same standards laid out by the office of the United States Director of National Intelligence.

What Are the Technical Specifications for Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities (SCIF)?

DCID 6/9 is the “Physical Security Standards for Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities” Manual, as approved by the Director of Central Intelligence (DCI). The current edition is dated 18 November 2002. 

Basic requirements as per DCID 6/9:

  • Must be alarmed with an electronic intrusion detection system.
  • Permanent dry wall construction is required.
  • Sensitive information must be stored in general service administration (GSA) approved security containers for “closed storage classifications”.
  • There must be a response force capable of responding to an alarm within 15 minutes after announcement, and a reserve response force available to assist said initial responders.

For more details, view the technical specifications for construction and management of SCIF rooms as per DCID 6/9.          

What about SCIF Doors?

When it comes to SCIF room designs, they are basically secure rooms, constructed using materials that block espionage attempts and keep sensitive information secret. Since the door opening is the one component of the room that opens and closes, it is the most difficult part of the room to secure. Although the door is only open for short periods of time, spies may be able to detect patterns through hours of recordings. Acoustic steel doors, frames as well as wood acoustic doors help limit the amount of sound transmission from one side of the assembly to the other.

SCIF Doors Requirements for Entrances & Exits:    

  • Primary entrance doors into SCIFs shall be limited to one. If circumstances require more than one entrance, this must be approved by the CSA (Cognizant Security Authority). In cases where local fire regulations are more stringent, they will be complied with. All perimeter SCIF doors must be closed when not in use, with the exception of emergency circumstances.
  • All SCIF primary entrance doors must be equipped with an automatic door closer, a GSA-approved combination lock and an access control device
  • Solid wood core door, a minimum of 1-3/4 inches thick or, 16-gauge metal cladding over wood, a minimum of 1-3/4 inches thick or, metal fire or acoustical protection doors, a minimum of 1-3/4 inches thick required.
  • Specifications of doors, combination locks, access control devices and other related hardware may be obtained from the CSA.
  • SCIF doors are recommended to be three feet wide, single, swing, flush face doors. These doors should be without louvers, unusual undercuts, vision lights, transoms or side lights. Door pairs and exterior assemblies should also be avoided. 
  • SCIF door assemblies are recommended to match the general building door and frame style, size, appearance, color and finish to the extent possible. This includes paint finishes as well as wood door species, grain and stain.

View the full list of Entry, Exit and Access SCIF Door Requirements for more details.          

What Are SCIF Door Hardware Types and Standards?           

The two most referenced documents for SCIF design are ICD/ICS-705, Technical Specification for Construction and Management of Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities, [1] and NSA 94-106 [2]. It has been our experience that these documents are often referenced interchangeably or in conjunction with each other. In some cases, project documents will indicate that a facility has been designed to meet NSA 94-106 as identified in ICD/ICS-705. This is problematic as ICD/ICS-705 does not reference NSA 94-106, nor is ICD/ICS-705 intended to meet the requirements set forth in NSA 94-106. This article will analyze the purpose of ICD/ICS-705 and NSA 94-106, as it pertains to RF shielding and highlights some of the differences between the two standards.

Hardware Types:

These requirements for code compliance were carried forward into the 2019 edition of the federal specification (FF-L-2890C), which is called Lock Extensions (Pedestrian Door Lock Assembly Preassembled, Panic, and Auxiliary Deadbolt). This 30-page standard details the types of locks required for primary and secondary doors, which are divided into 10 hardware types:

Hardware for Primary Entrance Doors:
  • Type I – Lockset (PDPL) with mechanical or electronic stand-alone access control (i.e. keypad with a minimum 4-digit combination) – ANSI/BHMA A156.2 Grade 1, with electromechanical combination lock (FF-L-2740)
  • Type II – Lockset (PDPL) with the capability of being used with building access control system, fail secure – ANSI/BHMA A156.2 Grade 1, with electromechanical combination lock (FF-L-2740)
  • Type III – Panic hardware/fire exit hardware (PDLAP), rim type, with mechanical or electronic stand-alone access control (i.e. keypad with a minimum 4-digit combination) – ANSI/BHMA A156.3 Grade 1 Type I, with electromechanical combination lock (FF-L-2740)
  • Type IV – Panic hardware/fire exit hardware (PDLAP), rim type, with the capability of being used with the building access control system, fail secure – ANSI/BHMA A156.3 Grade 1 Type I, with electromechanical combination lock (FF-L-2740)
  • Type V – Deadbolt (ADB) – ANSI/BHMA A156.36 Grade 1, with electromechanical combination lock (FF-L-2740) and escape mechanism extension with an automatic life safety device with keyed reset function
  • Type VI – Deadbolt (ADB) – ANSI/BHMA A156.36 Grade 1, with electromechanical combination lock (FF-L-2740) and escape mechanism extension with a manually operated life safety device.
Hardware for Secondary Entrance Doors:
  • Type VII – Lockset (PDPL) with the capability of being used with building access control system, fail secure – ANSI/BHMA A156.2 Grade 1, with integral deadbolt and thumb turn
  • Type VIII – Panic hardware/fire exit hardware (PDLAP), rim type, with the capability of being used with the building access control system, fail secure – ANSI/BHMA A156.3 Grade 1 Type I, with integral deadbolt and thumb turn.
Hardware for Emergency Egress- Only Doors:
  • Type IX – Lockset (PDPL) with integral deadbolt – ANSI/BHMA A156.2 Grade 1
  • Type X – Panic hardware/fire exit hardware (PDLAP), rim type, with integral deadbolt – ANSI/BHMA A156.3 Grade 1 Type I

Hardware types V and VI are intended to be used on doors that are not part of a required egress route and are not required to be operable with one hand and a single motion to unlatch the door for egress.  These locks would typically be used on unoccupied rooms such as telecommunications closets.  The remaining hardware types (I through IV and VII – X) are required to comply with the codes and standards referenced above, in addition to the applicable BHMA standards.

 

What is SCIF RF Shielding?     

In Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) rooms, utilizing an RF shielded door for an information vestibule adds an extra layer of protection. RF shielded doors have emerged as an ideal option for the outer opening of an information vestibule, due to the door’s hybrid capabilities of having an STC 50 rating along with shielding properties. SCIF rooms often have acoustic security requirements including denying aural access to classified information. While schools, boardrooms, or performing arts centers recommend STC 40 to 50 ratings, a SCIF compliant door must meet the ICD/ICS 705 standard determined by the Department of Defense in the United States and is typically STC rated at 50 or 55.

While SCIFs are complex and highly technical facilities, successful projects are about more than just the physical design and requirements. It is important to have a trusted design partner and manufacturer who understands not only your needs as a client, but also how to work with sensitive and confidential projects, all while interpreting and confirming your requirements and standards. For information on how we can help at AMBICO, feel free to get in touch with us today or request a quote. We look forward to ensuring your next project meets established SCIF room requirements with our acoustic door assemblies

Steve Peterman, Director of Sales and Marketing

Steve Peterman, 
Director of Sales and Marketing.

Steve is the Director of Sales and Marketing at AMBICO Limited. He has demonstrated his passion and provided exceptional service to the company. His continued hard work and enthusiasm towards AMBICO’s sales and marketing team has empowered every individual towards accomplishing their goals and cultivating a culture of respect. Steve has also managed the Engineering and Project Management groups affording him a wealth of product and industry knowledge.

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